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The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, Leicester Square, WC2 February 12, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Public History, Science Education, Science Museum Environment.
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The British middle and upper classes saw Queen Victoria’s reign as a time of great discovery and many of London’s great museums, galleries and exhibitions – including the Great Exhibition of 1851 – opened in the 1850s. Surviving examples are the Victoria and Albert (debuting in 1852 as Museum of Manufacture), the National Portrait Gallery (1856), the Reading Room at the British Museum (1857), and the Natural History Museum (1860). One that did not fare as well was The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, opened on March 18th, 1854.

via The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, Leicester Square, WC2.

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Index of 19th Century Naval Vessels February 12, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Public History.
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Index of 19th Century Naval Vessels.

User:Sage Ross (WMF) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia November 18, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Politics, Public History.
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I\’m Sage. I live in Pittsburgh, PA. I\’ve been a Wikipedian since 2005, a dad since 2009, and I was part of the \”Public Policy Initiative\” team at the Wikimedia Foundation in 2010 and 2011. My volunteer account userpage, User:Ragesoss, has a bit more biographical detail. If there\’s anything related to the Wikipedia Education Program I can help you with, please let me know.

via User:Sage Ross (WMF) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Who will hire all the PhDs? Not Canada’s universities – The Globe and Mail April 15, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Technology, History Job Market, Public History.
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A persistent theme in current discussions about graduate education and its outcomes is the question of whether Canada is “producing too many PhDs.” While enrollments and numbers of PhD graduates have increased with the encouragement of policy, more of these grads now struggle to find employment that matches the level and nature of their education – particularly employment in universities, as tenure-track faculty. The situation in Canada is not as dire as in the States where just this week it was reported that three quarters of faculty work as adjuncts, but accounts of under-employed PhDs working as waiters and cab drivers have become more common.

via Who will hire all the PhDs? Not Canada’s universities – The Globe and Mail.

Society for History in the Federal Government | Officers March 4, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Technology, Public History.
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Bringing together government professionals, academics, consultants, students, and citizens interested in understanding federal history work and the historical development of the federal government.

via Society for History in the Federal Government |  Officers.

Critical Theory and the Importance of Religious Studies | Bulletin for the Study of Religion December 19, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in Public History.
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A common response to critical theory’s critiques of categories related to “religion” is that it undermines the rationale for the academic study of religion. If the categories do not exist, then what is the point of the field? Because people employ the categories strategically, promoting various interests, religious studies becomes more relevant as critical theory facilitates analysis of those strategic applications of the category.

via Critical Theory and the Importance of Religious Studies | Bulletin for the Study of Religion.

50 Years of NASAs budget vs. 1 year of Pentagon spending – Democratic Underground November 22, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in Politics, Public History.
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50 Years of NASAs budget vs. 1 year of Pentagon spending – Democratic Underground.

Museum History: Dr. Frank Oppenheimer | Exploratorium November 8, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Public History, Science Center News.
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Dr. Frank Oppenheimer

The qualities that made Exploratorium Founder Frank Oppenheimer so special are the same qualities that make the Exploratorium special: an insistence on excellence, a knack for finding new ways of looking at things, a lack of pretentiousness, and a respect for invention and play.

via Museum History: Dr. Frank Oppenheimer | Exploratorium.

Early History August 27, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Public History.
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JPL Director, 1944 – 1946 Born October 2, 1912, in Brenham, Texas, Frank Malina was one of the United States’ first rocket engineers. He graduated from Texas A&M University in 1934, then moved to the California Institute of Technology on a fellowship. He earned master’s degrees in mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Caltech before beginning his Ph.D. work on rocket propulsion. In 1936, with help from Caltech professor Theodore von Kármán, Malina formed the Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory (known as GALCIT) Rocket Research Project. His research with this group led to his 1940 Ph.D. thesis on rocket propulsion theory. In 1940, Malina’s group received its first funds from the U.S. Army Air Corps. They started construction of some research and testing facilities in the Arroyo Seco, and in 1944 the site was formally constituted as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

via Early History.

Leonardo On-Line: About Frank Malina August 27, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Public History.
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1968 Malina continued producing artwork and editing Leonardo until his death in 1981.1981 Following Frank Malinas death in 1981, Leonardo was moved to California by his son, Roger F. Malina, then an astronomer at the University of California at Berkeley.1982 With the support of founding board members Frank Oppenheimer and Robert Maxwell, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology Leonardo/ISAST was formed in 1982. Leonardo/ISAST was created to address the rapidly expanding needs of the art, science and technology community, by participation in conferences, symposia, festivals, lecture series and awards programs. The journal is now published by MIT press.

via Leonardo On-Line: About Frank Malina.