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The San Diego Natural History Museum unveils its new Coast to Cactus exhibit Saturday. | UTSanDiego.com January 11, 2015

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History.
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Starting Saturday, San Diegans can crawl through a mudflat and camp out in an Airstream trailer at the San Diego Natural History Museum’s new, 8,000 square foot exhibit “Coast to Cactus.”

The exhibit explores the vast diversity of the region’s ecosystems, from coastal estuaries to inland deserts, telling the story of its unique plants and animals.

via The San Diego Natural History Museum unveils its new Coast to Cactus exhibit Saturday. | UTSanDiego.com.

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Nashville Public Radio | Did Nashville Do The Right Thing When It Found 800 Year Old Artifacts? – Nashville Public Radio April 25, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History, Politics.
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To Smith, there doesn’t appear to be a good option between a very large scale project and the relatively small one that took place:

“The ethics are relatively simple — archaeology destroys its subject matter.  Unlike trees that can be replanted, archaeological sites are not renewable resources — when an archaeologist walks away from a dig, the detailed notes, photographs, and other records are all that will ever remain of that particular site.  Hence, unless we have the time and resources to conduct the best archaeology possible — we prefer to preserve things until the time that we do have the time and resources to do the job right.”

via Nashville Public Radio | Did Nashville Do The Right Thing When It Found 800 Year Old Artifacts? – Nashville Public Radio.

Dooley lauds board appointee as Harvard grad, but she wasn’t : News April 22, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History.
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Whitaker said her degree, an associate’s degree, actually was earned from what was then called the Tobé-Coburn School for Fashion Careers, in New York City. It was the nation’s first school to specialize in fashion merchandising and promotion, according to school literature.

via Dooley lauds board appointee as Harvard grad, but she wasn’t : News.

Zoo Museum Board member’s company wins Science Center contract : News April 22, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History.
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Zoo Museum Board member’s company wins Science Center contract : News.

Loeb’s museum board history not a strong case for Sotheby’s | New York Post April 17, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History, Politics.
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Loeb’s museum board history not a strong case for Sotheby’s | New York Post.

Art-Language / Facsimile Edition April 17, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History.
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Art-Language / Facsimile Edition

Volumes 1 to 5, May 1969 – March 1985 – Boxed Facsimile Edition, Including New Author Index and Title Index, January 2000.

via Art-Language / Facsimile Edition.

Eastman Kodak – 1939 York World’s Fair – Production & Distribution Zone February 15, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Museum History, Technology Reporting.
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Emphasis was on how chemical advancements had made photography possible and its effects on everyday life in amateur, professional, commercial, and industrial photography. A section was devoted to Tennessee Eastman and the manufacture of cellulose acetate products.

via Eastman Kodak – 1939 York World’s Fair – Production & Distribution Zone.

Museum 2.0: Warning: Museum Graduate Programs Spawn Legions of Zombies! January 22, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Exploratorium, Museum History.
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Summer\’s coming to D.C., and with it flocks of museum studies / education / exhibit planning graduate interns. I’m always curious when I meet these folks, who are about my age, choosing a different entry path into the museum world. The value proposition of museum grad programs is cloudy in my mind. Is it a credential that serves as a gateway to better jobs? Is it an education that would make me a better person? Sure, it’s great to learn museum theory and history. But I have some big concerns about museums studies programs, namely:Standardizing the field limits the potential for radical change. I confess I often feel this way about school in general. One of the reasons I fell in love with museums is because they support learning that is distinctly un-school-like. So I see these programs as a threat, an encroachment of schoolishness on the willfully unschooled. Following a standardized curriculum to prepare for work in the museum field homogenizes the perspectives and skills people bring to museum jobs. I think one of the things that keep museums fresh, welcoming, and non-didactic is the fact that most exhibit designers, museum educators, and conservators come from a variety of backgrounds. You were a carpenter. I was an engineer. She was a ceramicist. He wrote poetry. Sure, we may have some communication trouble getting on the same page. But that’s worth it for the wealth of different experiences we bring to the table.

via Museum 2.0: Warning: Museum Graduate Programs Spawn Legions of Zombies!.

Knowing history: Behind Civ Vs Brave New World | Polygon June 27, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Technology, Museum History, Video Games.
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DESIGNER ED BEACH ON BRAVE NEW WORLDS ANTIQUITY SITES”What we do is … we have a number of events that are worthy of archaeological data storage. We get one of those on the [game] tile and we write that in there. The oldest one wins.”We want to try to unearth all that ancient stuff. So where that goodie hut was has been recorded. If theres a battle there now, that probably wont get recorded on that tile, just because we want to keep remembering the goodie hut. That was the oldest kernel of information about that site.”When you start to work those antiquity sites and send an archaeologist out there, you have two choices. You can create a landmark there. Thats going to provide culture. Once you get hotels and airports online, it also produces tourism. Or you can bring it back to your museum. Obviously, if its outside your territory, you probably want to bring it back. But the ones that are in your territory, you have to decide which way to go on that.”The amount of culture and tourism generated is based on how old it is. That increases during the game, so its a really simple formula. If youre in the medieval era, which is the third era in the game, and this goodie hut was from the ancient era — where we are right now, the first era in the game — its just two eras further, so you get two culture from it. But as you go, each era you progress through the game, all your sites start building up more and more.”You always want to keep those oldest landmarks possible, because then you get the greater culture out of them. Sometimes you dont remember. Was there really a goodie hut there? But its really cool. Like, occasionally one was in a very interesting spot, where you got it just before some other player got to it, so you remember that. The barbarian camps, I tend to remember them the best, because those usually required a little bit of effort to root them out.”When you get the antiquity site that says, Hey, there was a barbarian camp here and you plundered it, thats kind of fun to remember.”

via Knowing history: Behind Civ Vs Brave New World | Polygon.

Oral History Transcript — Dr. Frank Oppenheimer March 29, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Exploratorium, Museum History, Science Museum Environment.
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Oral History Transcript — Dr. Frank OppenheimerThis transcript may not be quoted, reproduced or redistributed in whole or in part by any means except with the written permission of the American Institute of Physics.This transcript is based on a tape-recorded interview deposited at the Center for History of Physics of the American Institute of Physics. The AIPs interviews have generally been transcribed from tape, edited by the interviewer for clarity, and then further edited by the interviewee. If this interview is important to you, you should consult earlier versions of the transcript or listen to the original tape. For many interviews, the AIP retains substantial files with further information about the interviewee and the interview itself. Please contact us for information about accessing these materials.Please bear in mind that: 1 This material is a transcript of the spoken word rather than a literary product; 2 An interview must be read with the awareness that different peoples memories about an event will often differ, and that memories can change with time for many reasons including subsequent experiences, interactions with others, and ones feelings about an event. Disclaimer: This transcript was scanned from a typescript, introducing occasional spelling errors. The original typescript is available.

via Oral History Transcript — Dr. Frank Oppenheimer.