jump to navigation

The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, Leicester Square, WC2 February 12, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Public History, Science Education, Science Museum Environment.
trackback

The British middle and upper classes saw Queen Victoria’s reign as a time of great discovery and many of London’s great museums, galleries and exhibitions – including the Great Exhibition of 1851 – opened in the 1850s. Surviving examples are the Victoria and Albert (debuting in 1852 as Museum of Manufacture), the National Portrait Gallery (1856), the Reading Room at the British Museum (1857), and the Natural History Museum (1860). One that did not fare as well was The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, opened on March 18th, 1854.

via The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, Leicester Square, WC2.

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: