jump to navigation

Talebearing • A Career in Science Will Cost You Your Firstborn January 10, 2015

Posted by sandyclaus in Science Education.
add a comment

A Career in Science Will Cost You Your Firstborn

“I hate science.”  In six years of graduate school, this has to be the phrase I’ve heard most frequently from my colleagues.

People who have dedicated their lives to science.

People who made a decision when they were about 16 years old to focus on science, who went through four years of undergrad and an average 6 years of graduate school, and 4-10 more years of training.

People who’ve spent every moment since 2000 entirely dedicated to making new facts using the scientific process.

“I hate science.” Why this instead of, “I love science?”

via Talebearing • A Career in Science Will Cost You Your Firstborn.

The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, Leicester Square, WC2 February 12, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Public History, Science Education, Science Museum Environment.
add a comment

The British middle and upper classes saw Queen Victoria’s reign as a time of great discovery and many of London’s great museums, galleries and exhibitions – including the Great Exhibition of 1851 – opened in the 1850s. Surviving examples are the Victoria and Albert (debuting in 1852 as Museum of Manufacture), the National Portrait Gallery (1856), the Reading Room at the British Museum (1857), and the Natural History Museum (1860). One that did not fare as well was The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, opened on March 18th, 1854.

via The Royal Panopticon of Science & Art, Leicester Square, WC2.

Creationism debate: Should we engage anti-science? February 12, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Creationist / Anti-Creationist, Informal Science Education, Politics, Science Education.
add a comment

Roughly half the population of America does believe in some form of creationism or another. Half. Given that creationism is provably wrong, and science has enjoyed huge overwhelming success over the years, something is clearly broken in our country.

I suspect that what’s wrong is our messaging. For too long, scientists have thought that facts speak for themselves. They don’t. They need advocates. If we ignore the attacks on science, or simply counter them by reciting facts, we’ll lose. That much is clear from the statistics. Facts and stories of science are great for rallying those already on our side, but they do little to sway believers.

About last night’s debate, my colleague Mark Stern at Slate argues that Nye lost the debate just by showing up, and I see that same sentiment from people on social media. But I disagree. We’ve been losing this debate in the public’s mind all along by not showing up. Sure, science advocates are there when this topic comes up in court, and I’m glad for it. But I think that we need to have more of a voice, and that voice needs to change. What Nye did last night was at least a step in that direction, so in that sense I’m glad he did this.

via Creationism debate: Should we engage anti-science?.

Tech Magazines Used to Expose Psychics, Astrologers, and Other Frauds October 15, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Science Education.
add a comment

If you were a psychic, astrologer, spiritualist or any other kind of charlatan in the 1920s, you had no greater enemy than the science and technology magazines of the era. Many publishers of the 1920s saw calling out bullshit peddlers as a natural part of their broader mission. And they did so in glorious fashion — by giving away the pseudo-supernatural secrets of countless frauds.

via Tech Magazines Used to Expose Psychics, Astrologers, and Other Frauds.

US NSF – EHR – DRL – Division Static Template June 23, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Technology, Science Education, Science Museum Environment.
add a comment

DRL invests in projects to improve the effectiveness of STEM learning for people of all ages. Its mission includes promoting innovative research, development, and evaluation of learning and teaching across all STEM disciplines by advancing cutting-edge knowledge and practices in both formal and informal learning settings. DRL also promotes the broadening and deepening of capacity and impact in the educational sciences by encouraging the participation of scientists, engineers, and educators from the range of disciplines represented at NSF. Therefore, DRLs role in the larger context of Federal support for education research and evaluation is to be a catalyst for change—advancing theory, method, measurement, development, and application in STEM education. The Division seeks to advance both early, promising innovations as well as larger-scale adoptions of proven educational innovations. In doing so, it challenges the field to create the ideas, resources, and human capacity to bring about the needed transformation of STEM education for the 21st century.

via US NSF – EHR – DRL – Division Static Template.

Science is Elementary | Inspiring a passion for science in the citizens of tomorrow April 1, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Technology, Science Education.
add a comment

 

Science is Elementary | Inspiring a passion for science in the citizens of tomorrow.