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\Broad, William J. “The Science Corps Wants a Few More Heretics,” New York Times, 16 October 2, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Politics, History of Science.
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She had fallen between thecrack years ago and now, very dramatically, her independence has been richly rewarded. It is thestuff of which legends are made. To Broad, Big Science has become too conservative for its owngood and something like counterculture science is necessary as a corrective. Speculations inScience and Technology, a journal published in Australia, is an example of one such effort, as isTruzzi’s offbeat Center for Scientific Anomalies Research, Eastern Michigan University.

via \Broad, William J. “The Science Corps Wants a Few More Heretics,” New York Times, 16.

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Science_Fraud_Database October 2, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Politics, Academic Technology, History of Science.
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Science Fraud Database Professor A.C. Higgins About This DatabasePublications In Science Fraud10 Years Discussion in SciFraud

via Science_Fraud_Database.

About | Medical Heritage Library March 25, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Medicine, History of Science.
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About

The Medical Heritage Library (MHL), a digital curation collaborative among some of the world’s leading medical libraries, promotes free and open access to quality historical resources in medicine. Our goal is to provide the means by which readers and scholars across a multitude of disciplines can examine the interrelated nature of medicine and society, both to inform contemporary medicine and strengthen understanding of the world in which we live. The MHL’s growing collection of digitized medical rare books, pamphlets, journals, and films number in the tens of thousands, with representative works from each of the past six centuries, all of which are available here through the Internet Archive.

Collections Statement:

Materials are included in MHL once we have determined, to the best of our knowledge, that the materials are in the public domain under U.S. copyright law, or that the library making the digital version has received permission from the holder(s) of the copyright in the specific materials. If you have questions about the copyright status or permissions regarding a particular item, please contact the relevant digitizing partner via their contact information on the “About” page of this site or the digitizing partner’s Collection page on Internet Archive.

via About | Medical Heritage Library.

14 Wacky “Facts” Kids Will Learn in Louisiana’s Voucher Schools | Mother Jones March 10, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Politics.
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For one, of the 119 (mostly Christian) participating schools, Zack Kopplin, a gutsy college sophomore who’s taken to Change.org to stonewall the program, has identified at least 19 that teach or champion creationist nonscience and will rake in nearly $4 million in public funding from the initial round of voucher designations.

Read about Bobby Jindal’s exorcism problem.

via 14 Wacky “Facts” Kids Will Learn in Louisiana’s Voucher Schools | Mother Jones.

Informal Commons – Home Page March 4, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in Academic Technology, History of Science.
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Informal Commons – Home Page.

Museum History: Dr. Frank Oppenheimer | Exploratorium November 8, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Public History, Science Center News.
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Dr. Frank Oppenheimer

The qualities that made Exploratorium Founder Frank Oppenheimer so special are the same qualities that make the Exploratorium special: an insistence on excellence, a knack for finding new ways of looking at things, a lack of pretentiousness, and a respect for invention and play.

via Museum History: Dr. Frank Oppenheimer | Exploratorium.

Leonardo On-Line: The Leonardo Story August 27, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science.
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Frank Malina, founder of Leonardo, was an American scientist. After receiving his Ph.D from the California Institute of Technology in 1936, Malina directed the WAC Corporal program that put the first rocket beyond the Earth’s atmosphere. He co-founded and was the second director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), co-founded the Aerojet General Corporation and was an active participant in rocket-science development in the period leading up to and during World War II.

Invited to join the United Nations Education, Science and Culture Organization (UNESCO) in 1947 by Julian Huxley, Malina moved to Paris as the director of the organization’s science programs. The separation between science and the humanities was the subject of intense debate during the post-war period, particularly after the publication of C.P. Snow’s Two Cultures in 1959. The concept that there was and should be a natural relationship between science and art fascinated Malina, eventually influencing him to synthesize his scientific experience with his long-standing artistic sensibilities. As an artist, Malina moved from traditional media to mesh, string and canvas constructions and finally to experiments with light, which led to his development of systems for kinetic painting.

via Leonardo On-Line: The Leonardo Story.

Roger Malina, son of Rocketeer Frank Malina, given mention in Huffington Post article. August 27, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Science Center News.
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“PROPULSION” friend and editor in chief of Leonardo Magazine on science and art receives a mention in widely read online publication.

(SPACE) – Fresh off the success of the “Pleasure of Light: Malina/Kepes” retrospective exhibition at the Ludwig Museum in Budapest, Roger Malina was given a proper shout-out in an article by blogger “Max Eternity”. The article is about artist/educator Joe Nalven and his recent “Homage” showcase, a touring exhibition co-curated by Nalven and digital artist Jim Repress.

The Huffington Post, long read for political discourse, has recently invited bloggers and reporters from outside the political realm and Mr. Eternity is just the latest example of outside-the-box journalists throwing in their two cents. In the Oct 19, 2010 post, Eternity states:

“About 6 months back, I had an email exchange with Roger Malina, editor of Leonardo Magazine, who said to me that in reading some of my writings, it “reminded me how long it is taking the mainstream art world to really integrate digital and new media into their views of the world.”

via Roger Malina, son of Rocketeer Frank Malina, given mention in Huffington Post article..

Early History August 27, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Public History.
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JPL Director, 1944 – 1946 Born October 2, 1912, in Brenham, Texas, Frank Malina was one of the United States’ first rocket engineers. He graduated from Texas A&M University in 1934, then moved to the California Institute of Technology on a fellowship. He earned master’s degrees in mechanical and aeronautical engineering at Caltech before beginning his Ph.D. work on rocket propulsion. In 1936, with help from Caltech professor Theodore von Kármán, Malina formed the Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory (known as GALCIT) Rocket Research Project. His research with this group led to his 1940 Ph.D. thesis on rocket propulsion theory. In 1940, Malina’s group received its first funds from the U.S. Army Air Corps. They started construction of some research and testing facilities in the Arroyo Seco, and in 1944 the site was formally constituted as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

via Early History.

Leonardo On-Line: About Frank Malina August 27, 2012

Posted by sandyclaus in History of Science, Public History.
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1968 Malina continued producing artwork and editing Leonardo until his death in 1981.1981 Following Frank Malinas death in 1981, Leonardo was moved to California by his son, Roger F. Malina, then an astronomer at the University of California at Berkeley.1982 With the support of founding board members Frank Oppenheimer and Robert Maxwell, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology Leonardo/ISAST was formed in 1982. Leonardo/ISAST was created to address the rapidly expanding needs of the art, science and technology community, by participation in conferences, symposia, festivals, lecture series and awards programs. The journal is now published by MIT press.

via Leonardo On-Line: About Frank Malina.