jump to navigation

Crushing the Occupy Movement – How Wall Street Used Government Forces to Suppress Political Dissent April 14, 2015

Posted by sandyclaus in FBI, Occupy, Politics.
add a comment

It has been over two years since the Occupy Movement was brutally destroyed by a coordinated national effort led by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security. Since that time, much documentation has been released under the Freedom of Information Act. Even though they are heavily redacted, these documents provide a frightening window into how far corporate America along with the federal, state, and local governments acting as their agents were willing to go to destroy a populist social movement like Occupy.

Despite all the documentation we have, there are still many out there who are in denial about these facts. After reading some recent comments that misrepresent what happened to the Occupy Movement, I decided to review how Occupy was so brutally squelched by Wall Street and corporate America using government forces as their agents acting upon their behalf.

via Crushing the Occupy Movement – How Wall Street Used Government Forces to Suppress Political Dissent.

Advertisements

Ex-official: FBI can secretly activate an individual’s webcam without indicator light – MacDailyNews – Welcome Home January 9, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Computer Security, FBI, NSA, Security, Security State.
add a comment

“The FBI has been able to covertly activate a computer’s camera — without triggering the light that lets users know it is recording — for several years, and has used that technique mainly in terrorism cases or the most serious criminal investigations, said Marcus Thomas, former assistant director of the FBI’s Operational Technology Division in Quantico, now on the advisory board of Subsentio, a firm that helps telecommunications carriers comply with federal wiretap statutes,” Timberg and Nakashima report. “The ability to remotely activate video feeds was among the issues cited in a case in Houston, where federal magistrate Judge Stephen W. Smith rejected a search warrant request from the FBI in April. In that case, first reported by the Wall Street Journal, Smith ruled that the use of such technology in a bank fraud case was ‘extremely intrusive’ and ran the risk of accidentally capturing information of people not under suspicion of any crime.

via Ex-official: FBI can secretly activate an individual’s webcam without indicator light – MacDailyNews – Welcome Home.

FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance – The Washington Post January 9, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in Computer Security, FBI, NSA, Security State.
add a comment

A federal magistrate in Denver approved sending surveillance software to Mo’s computer last year. Not all such requests are welcomed by the courts: An FBI plan to send surveillance software to a suspect in a different case — one that involved activating a suspect’s built-in computer camera — was rejected by a federal magistrate in Houston, who ruled that it was “extremely intrusive” and could violate the Fourth Amendment.

“You can’t just go on a fishing expedition,” said Laura K. Donohue, a Georgetown University law professor who reviewed three recent court rulings on FBI surveillance software, including one involving Mo. “There needs to be a nexus between the crime being alleged and the material to be seized. What they are doing here, though, is collecting everything.”

The FBI and Justice Department declined to comment on the case or the surveillance techniques used in pursuit of Mo.

But court documents related to the investigation, created when the FBI requested a search warrant before sending the surveillance software across the Internet to Mo, have offered a rare window into the bureau’s tools for tracking suspects through an online landscape replete with places to hide.

The case also shows the limits of the surveillance software, which have not yielded Mo’s arrest, and the legal complexities created when the location of a subject is unknown.

via FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance – The Washington Post.

Schneier on Security: More about the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations Unit January 9, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in FBI, NSA, Security, Security State.
add a comment

These minor disruptions in the parcel shipping business rank among the \”most productive operations\” conducted by the NSA hackers, one top secret document relates in enthusiastic terms. This method, the presentation continues, allows TAO to obtain access to networks \”around the world.\”

They can install the software implants using techniques like QUANTUM and FOXACID.

Related is this list of NSA attack tools. And here is another article on TAO from October.

Remember, this is not just about the NSA. The NSA shares these tools with the FBI\’s black bag teams for domestic surveillance, and presumably with the CIA and DEA as well. Other countries are going to have similar bags of tricks, depending on their sophistication and budgets. And today\’s secret NSA programs are tomorrow\’s PhD theses, and the next day\’s criminal hacking tools. Even if you trust the NSA to only spy on \”enemies,\” consider this an advance warning of what we have to secure ourselves against in the future.

via Schneier on Security: More about the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations Unit.

Meet the Spies Doing the NSA’s Dirty Work January 9, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in DITU, FBI, NSA, Privacy, Security, Security State.
add a comment

When the media and members of Congress say the NSA spies on Americans, what they really mean is that the FBI helps the NSA do it, providing a technical and legal infrastructure that permits the NSA, which by law collects foreign intelligence, to operate on U.S. soil. It\’s the FBI, a domestic U.S. law enforcement agency, that collects digital information from at least nine American technology companies as part of the NSA\’s Prism system. It was the FBI that petitioned the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to order Verizon Business Network Services, one of the United States\’ biggest telecom carriers for corporations, to hand over the call records of millions of its customers to the NSA.

But the FBI is no mere errand boy for the United States\’ biggest intelligence agency. It carries out its own signals intelligence operations and is trying to collect huge amounts of email and Internet data from U.S. companies — an operation that the NSA once conducted, was reprimanded for, and says it abandoned.

via Meet the Spies Doing the NSA’s Dirty Work.