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LEGO® WeDo™ Construction Set – Scratch Wiki January 15, 2015

Posted by sandyclaus in 3D Printing, Academic Technology, Video Games.
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“Motor” redirects here. For the block category with that name, see Motor Blocks.

A LEGO WeDo robot being used with Scratch.

The LEGO® WeDo™ Construction Kit is a simple robotics tool designed for ages 7–11. It allows users to design their own interactive machines, and then program them using drag-and-drop software like Scratch.

In Scratch 2.0, you can add a LEGO WeDo extension within the “More Blocks” category. Click “Add an Extension” and choose “LEGO WeDo.”

via LEGO® WeDo™ Construction Set – Scratch Wiki.

The Micro is a $200 3D printer that can make a teacup in an hour April 7, 2014

Posted by sandyclaus in 3D Printing.
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To keep costs down, Armani and his team reduced The Micro’s volume. He said that during manufacturing it’s important to remember that product-size scales to the third power. If the device is made half the size in one dimension, it’s actually being reduced by a factor of eight in terms of weight, material cost and shipping. “That’s one way that we can pass savings on to the end-user.”

via The Micro is a $200 3D printer that can make a teacup in an hour.

Stratasys seizes 3D printer from man who tried to make gun | Geek-Cetera | Geek.com March 25, 2013

Posted by sandyclaus in 3D Printing, Politics.
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For Wilson and Defense Distributed, the goal is to ultimately provide an open-source platform where users can both upload and download 3D-printed gun schematics. The group raised more than $20,000, enough for a down payment on the high-end 3D printer from Stratasys, which has been involved in some great projects, including giving a little girl magic arms.

Once that company discovered Wilson’s intentions, they emailed and informed him they would be making arrangements to pick up the device from his house. Startasys decided to revoke the lease. Of course Wilson argued, but Stratasys said its policy was to not allow its products to be used for illegal purposes.

Stratasys said that because Wilson did not have a firearms manufacturing license, trying to fabricate a working pistol was illegal. Wilson argued that, in part, because he was not planning on selling the printed guns, he didn’t need a license.

via Stratasys seizes 3D printer from man who tried to make gun | Geek-Cetera | Geek.com.